Economics & Sociology

ISSN: 2071-789X eISSN: 2306-3459 DOI: 10.14254/2071-789X
Index PUBMS: f5512f57-a601-11e7-8f0e-080027f4daa0
Article information
Title: The Morally Hazardous Modern Corporate World – a Free Market Distinction Between Vicious and Vitiated Corporations
Issue: Vol. 5, No 2a, 2012
Published date: 20-07-2012 (print) / 20-07-2012 (online)
Journal: Economics & Sociology
ISSN: 2071-789X, eISSN: 2306-3459
Authors: Octavian-Dragomir Jora
Mihaela Iacob
Keywords: business corporation, private property rights, free market, interventionism, financial regulations, antitrust regulations, moral hazard, praxeological ethics and economics
DOI: 10.14254/2071-789X.2012/5-2a/12
Index PUBMS: 20bd45c7-aa13-11e7-8eae-080027f4daa0
Language: English
Pages: 149-161 (13)
JEL classification: B53, K20, L20, M20
Website: https://www.economics-sociology.eu/?206,en_the-morally-hazardous-modern-corporate-world-%E2%80%93-a-free-market-distinction-between-vicious-and-vitiated-corporations
Abstract

In the present paper, we identify the corporation in its ultimate, proprietary meaning (as an expression of an aggregate of resources owned by shareholders and used according to their allocating-entrepreneurial vision), homogenizing, in some way, the entrepreneurial-capitalistic-managerial “interests” from within itself and, this time, treating the “shareholders vs. managers” tension as irrelevant. We distinguish, within this simplified framework, situations where corporate actors (the “shareholding-managerial aggregate”) gain together social privileges, undue rights on third party resources or, on the contrary, are prejudiced, together, by third parties. Either way, the “key character” is the State, which institutionalizes aggression and incites to free riding. We consider, in this logic, by “vicious-corporation” that which succeeds (while tolerated / encouraged by the public authorities) in acquiring resources from the rest of the society, without the righteous owners’ prior consent. It does this either by “material” redistribution – explicit transfer of expropriated resources – or by “virtual” redistribution – implicit rents from dedicated regulations –, internalizing this behaviour (moral hazard) in its day to day routine. We symmetrically define by “vitiated-corporation” that which is expropriated (materially, virtually) by third parties (mainly the rival corporations) which take comfort from this habit, rather than simply serving consumers.